In 1847, A Water-Cure Proudly Advertises How Pure Their Water Is

ANTIQUE DISTILLED WATERS HOSPITAL ADVERTISEMENT

LEBANON SPRINGS WATER-CURE ESTABLISHMENT

YOU CAN SEE ITS VERY IMPORTANT FOR THEM TO LET YOU KNOW HOW PURE THEIR WATER IS AND THEY GLADLY GIVE THE NUMBERS TO PROVE IT IN TERMS OF GRAINS PER GALLON

(NOTE: Grains per gallon (gpg) is a unit of water hardness defined as 1 grain of calcium carbonate dissolved in 1 US gallon of water. 1 grain per gallon translates into 17.1 parts per million (ppm).)

New-York Weekly Tribune, Oct 10, 1847.

The newspaper contained a prominent 8″ x 5″ back page illustrated ad for “Lebanon Springs Water-Cure Establishment” with a view of what is now NEW LEBANON , NY (Columbia County) as it looked in 1847, 170 years ago…

LEBANON SPRINGS WATER-CURE ESTABLISHMENT

This is one of the oldest Establishments in this country; and, in view of all the facilities here afforded for the practice of Water-Cure, the abundance and variety of water, the picturesque scenery, the pure and exhilarating mountain air, its central situation -so near to the great thoroughfares which connect East and West, North and South -the Establishment will, doubtless, continue to receive its due share of patronage.  It has now extensive accommodations.  At the central house, the various Baths, as Plunge, Shower, Douche, Hose, Fountain, Vapor, Eye, and Ear, cold or warm, are so constructed as to be comfortable, inviting, and easy access by invalids, at all times.  The rooms are so warmed as to render them perfectly comfortable, even in the coldest weather; and for winter treatment,  the water from the celebrated Warm spring is much used.  For such as can go abroad in summer, a bathing house has been built in the beautiful glen, thirty rods distant from the Infirmary, adapted to the entire treatment, with an ever-flowing and living Plunge and Douche Bath -the latter descending, perpendicularly, thirty feet, the column two inches in diameter, and white with motion.

At the principle Cold spring, half a mile distant, a large Bathing house is built, adapted to summer treatment.  The water at this spring is at at temperature of 46 degrees in midsummer.  Another Cold spring, at a temperature of 50 degrees, has been improved.

For Winter, as well as Summer treatment, this… (here the ad is broken off, and continues on the next column as follows…)

…in coldest weather.  The stream courses its way through large Plunge and Swimming Baths; and an eligible site, commanding the entire stream, and designed for future enlargement and accommodation, has been purchased, where the water has a fall of thirty feet.  The Cold mountain water, applied to bathing domestic purposes, has a pressure of from eighty to a hundred feet.

The expense, per week, is from $6 to $10, varying according to room occupied and attention required.  Patients furnish their own towels and bandages, and also extra sheets, blankets, comfortables, & etc.

Note.  The following extract, from Dr. Shew’s Water-Cure Journal, shows the purity of the water here, compared with other Springs:  “The water at Grafenberg, according to an analysis made by Dr. Chilton, contains one and a half grains of mineral matter in the American gallon.  At Lebanon springs, the water used at Campbell & Co.’s Establishment is still purer, containing but little over one grain of mineral substances.  At Brattleborough, Vt., the analysis of one spring, as published by Dr. Wesselhoeft, shows between six and seven grains mineral in the gallon; a second spring, a much larger portion.  At Syosset, Long Island, our springs contain about three fourths of a grain only of mineral, the purest springs of which we have any record.  The slight trace of mineral in all these springs is, besides, of a much milder character than that of water generally, it being principally sodium-lime being the common impurity.”  The Croton water, in New York, has but about four and a half grains.

Lebanon Springs Water-Cure